USA Today: Flaring natural gas turns ‘drill, baby, drill’ to ‘burn, baby, burn’

As Europe bakes, wildfires burn in the Arctic Circle and July is shaping up as Earth’s hottest month since record-keeping began in 1880, Americans are becoming more keenly aware of global warming. They increasingly recognize the need to reduce burning fossil fuels that generate heat-trapping greenhouse gases.

Wind and solar are now the fastest growing sources of electricity. Scores of cities, counties and states are setting clean energy goals. Electric car sales are inching higher. Green upstarts are working to capture methane as a renewable fuel from livestock manure and food waste, rather than let it slip into atmosphere.

It might come as a shock that amid this growing sense of planet accountability, oil companies are still allowed to pull billions of cubic feet of natural gas from the ground and simply set it on fire.

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Las Cruces Sun News: Time to cut methane pollution in New Mexico

Industry is distorting the truth about the dangers of methane pollution from oil and gas drilling just as Gov. Lujan Grisham’s administration is taking action to cut methane and other air toxics in New Mexico.

Now, industry — in particular, their leading statewide trade association, the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association — hopes that by distorting public understanding about methane pollution and waste they can derail or delay efforts to address it.

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Las Cruces Sun News: Aztec, Durango mayors call for tough methane regulations

As elected officials in Durango, Colorado, and Aztec, New Mexico, we each serve communities that are very different. But what we have in common is a 2,500-square-mile problem that affects our shared economy, watershed and airshed. The Four Corners methane cloud is the largest source of methane pollution in North America and the reason why local, elected officials from New Mexico and Colorado are working together in support of strong, statewide methane regulations in New Mexico that will reduce this pollution and hold the oil and gas industry accountable.

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Forbes Op-ed: Can Fossil Fuel Companies Find A Place In A Climate-Friendly World?

We have to transform our energy system to avert the worst impacts of climate change. And if oil-and-gas companies want a place in that future, they must transform themselves—or else be consigned to history. Is it realistic to think fossil fuel companies could be part of the solution? Plenty of reasonable people say no, but I think constructive engagement with some in the industry can speed the transition. A few companies have taken meaningful steps in the right direction. To secure a place in the future, however, they need to think bigger and move faster.

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Albuquerque Journal Op-ed: Industry must focus on methane reforms

The oil and gas industry is up to its old tricks again, trying to deceive us that it’s going to clean up rampant methane pollution and waste from oil and gas production. But before I shed light on the oil and gas disinformation machine, let’s keep our eye on the ball: New Mexico can and should be a national leader that puts people over polluters by keeping methane and other air pollutants out of New Mexico’s beautiful skies.

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Forbes Op-ed: Applying Technology To Sustainability Is A Win-Win For Business And Profit

This week, business executives, tech entrepreneurs, and investors met in Aspen, Colorado at the Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2019 conference. This annual gathering brings movers and shakers together to discuss the latest tech trends and how businesses can find a competitive edge in a fast-paced marketplace. From retail to transportation to entertainment, technology advances are changing every industry, and knowing where the trends are heading can mean the difference between Netflix and Blockbuster.

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Crosscut Op-ed: Actually, Jay Inslee is right to oppose Kalama’s methanol plant

It is understandable that many people are confused about the methanol plant that Northwest Innovation Works wants to build in Kalama, Cowlitz County. It has a rather controversial history and there are vastly differing opinions about it. Let’s start with the facts.

The plant would be the largest methanol plant in the world. It would consume 320 million cubic feet of methane (the main component of natural gas) per day, more than is used by every gas-fired power plant in Washington combined. It would also use 5 million gallons of water per day, nearly what the entire city of Portland uses. The methanol produced would be shipped to China. Despite the seemingly local company name, NW Innovation Works is funded by the Chinese and is a commercial offshoot of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which is run by the government.

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