The Philadelphia Citizen Op-ed: Say No To Methane

The Environmental Protection Agency’s Administrator Andrew Wheeler wants to gut critical measures that reduce methane pollution from the oil and gas industry and help curb the climate crisis. Hundreds of thousands of people, including nine members of the Pennsylvania delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senator Bob Casey, sent comments to the EPA during the 60-day-comment period expressing their opposition to this reckless rollback.

The truth is that methane emissions cause 25 percent of the impacts from the climate crisis seen today. Methane traps heat and is 87 times more potent as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide over the first 20 years after it’s released into our atmosphere. Warming temperatures and increased precipitation fueled by climate changing methane create ideal conditions for extreme weather to develop.

Read more>>

Grand Junction Daily Sentinel Op-ed: Protect Coloradans by adopting uniform rules on harmful emissions

On Dec. 17, the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission will decide whether to adopt important updates to rules designed to reduce methane and ozone emissions from oil and gas operations throughout Colorado. This is an important moment for those of us living on the West Slope, where air pollution protections are not as strong as they are on the Front Range.

Fortunately, the state is proposing a stronger set of statewide rules that will go a long way in protecting the health of all Coloradans and our climate for those on both sides of the continental divide. Statewide standards are needed because the impacts of oil and gas development on air quality are the same throughout the state. Drilling, storage, disposal and transport of oil and gas releases the same exact pollutants, no matter where that activity is located.

Read more>>

The Hill Op-ed: Natural gas: Is it a bridge or roadblock?

Is natural gas a bridge or a roadblock to a clean energy future? That’s a vital question now that roughly half of Democratic presidential candidates support a ban on fracking, which is used to produce two-thirds of U.S. natural gas.

Even candidates who oppose a ban agree that the United States should aim for net-zero emissions overall by 2050 or sooner.

So far, the pursuit of net-zero has been far too slow, but natural gas has played a helpful role. American emissions of climate-warming gases have fallen roughly 15 percent from their peak. Replacing coal with natural gas for electricity contributed about a third of that reduction.

Whether natural gas helps or hurts the quest for further reductions will depend on two things: How we get it and how we use it.

Read more>>