Editorials

The Columbus Dispatch: Natural gas changes merit Earth Day celebration

While natural gas burns cleaner than coal, it also poses environmental risks because it consists primarily of methane, a greenhouse gas responsible for a quarter of global warming.

Some of the risk can be mitigated with better controls on leaks of methane into the atmosphere from wells and storage tanks, and the Kasich administration is a recognized leader in ensuring that happens — at least for newer facilities.

Still, Ohio loses 300,000 tons of natural gas a year to leaky equipment. The waste is worth about $40 million, according to the Environmental Defense Fund, a global nonprofit seeking bipartisan environmental solutions. With the savings available by retaining gas, stopping the leaks by extending quarterly checks to all existing facilities could be done at no net cost to facility owners, EDF says.

The Ohio EPA is quantifying results of the 2014 rules to help determine if it should bring existing well sites under the more-stringent requirements. It would engage the oil and gas industry and the Department of Natural Resources before any decision to move ahead, Butler said.

Ohio should extend the requirements to make every day Earth Day.

Read more>>

Billings Gazette: Methane waste debate flares again

Gas that leaks or flares from America’s public lands benefits no one. That’s why regulations to prevent waste can provide broad benefits.

Contrary to that common sense conclusion, the Trump administration has been trying to undo waste prevention rules finalized at the end of 2016 after years of public comment and study.

“The BLM is proposing to replace the venting and flaring rule with requirements similar to those that were in force prior to the 2016 final rule,” said a February press release from the BLM office in Washington, D.C. The release says the rollback is in compliance with President Trump’s executive order to promote “energy independence” and to modify regulations that “unnecessarily hinder economic growth and energy development.”

Read more>>

The Canton Repository: Well explosion reignites concern over methane

About three weeks ago, a natural gas well exploded and caught fire in southeastern Ohio’s Belmont County. According to a report from the Associated Press, the newly drilled well was being readied for production for XTO Energy when an incident occurred — a plume of gas and brine rising into the air before igniting.

After the explosion, residents from about 30 nearby homes were evacuated. It wasn’t until Wednesday crews finally were able to cap the well completely, allowing the last of the displaced families to return to their homes.

Fortunately, no one was injured.

Read more>>

San Antonio Express-News: Court blocks Trump on methane

One promising hallmark of President Donald Trump’s tenure has been the ability of federal courts to check his administration’s impulsive actions.

A recent appeals court ruling on methane emissions is an important example. By a 2-1 margin, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit struck down the Environmental Protection Agency’s 90-day suspension of new methane emissions standards for oil and gas wells.

The EPA had delayed implementation of the new rule for 90 days and has proposed extending that delay for another two years. The court found this was a smoke screen for repealing the rule without following the appropriate process.

My San Antonio: Court blocks Trump on methane

One promising hallmark of President Donald Trump’s tenure has been the ability of federal courts to check his administration’s impulsive actions.

A recent appeals court ruling on methane emissions is an important example. By a 2-1 margin, the U.S. Court of Appealsfor the District of Columbia Circuit struck down the Environmental Protection Agency’s 90-day suspension of new methane emissions standards for oil and gas wells.

The EPA had delayed implementation of the new rule for 90 days and has proposed extending that delay for another two years. The court found this was a smoke screen for repealing the rule without following the appropriate process.

Read more>>

Will Trump era undo Utah air quality progress?-Salt Lake Tribune

Meanwhile, Rep. Rob Bishop sees deregulatory opportunity in the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's rule on methane escaping from oil and gas operations. The Obama BLM recently put out rules to require operators to trap more methane, a change that not only cleans up the air but also gives operators more natural gas to sell. But Bishop wants Congress to rescind the methane rule, something he's betting a Trump BLM won't challenge.

When Rules No Longer Apply-New York Times

Mr. Trump won the presidency, in part, by promising to hold powerful interests accountable for practices that harm the public. But nullifying final rules — which went through a long, public process on the way to being issued — elevates corporate interests above all others

Just because the GOP can doesn't mean it should-Washington Post

Congress’s moves would be less concerning except for one of the most powerful provisions in the Congressional Review Act: a stipulation that, once lawmakers have rescinded a rule, federal agencies cannot issue a new one “substantially” like it. This legal standard has not been tested in court. But it means that Congress may be essentially barring agencies such as the Interior Department from revisiting issues such as methane pollution on federal lands in a rigorous way. That is not a legacy the 115th Congress should be seeking.

The largest methane leak in U.S. history began one year ago at Aliso Canyon. What have we learned since then?-Los Angeles Times

The leak was a wake-up call. Too few people had recognized the tremendous risks of Aliso Canyon —that an aging facility operating under grossly outdated and inadequate standards could wreak havoc on public health and the environment. About 80% of the facility’s wells were built before the 1970s, and Southern California Gas knew they were corroding and failing at an increasing rate. But there were no rules mandating frequent inspections or upgrades. What’s more, government officials didn’t seem sufficiently concerned that the state’s energy supply had become so heavily dependent on Aliso Canyon.

Inspect, improve, monitor gas storage-Pocono Record

Lawmakers themselves encouraged the Obama administration to create standards in response to the disastrous gas leak in Aliso Canyon. Poor facility design, combined with a lack of monitoring, contributed to the extent of the leak and the time it took to resolve it.

Industry professionals should embrace the recommendations as part of their corporate responsibility as they profit off the Keystone State's wealth of natural gas. Citizens' health and safety should always come before corporate profit.

1 2 3 5